Geography and Vision: Seeing, Imagining and Representing the by Denis Cosgrove

By Denis Cosgrove

Geography and Vision is a chain of private reflections by way of prime cultural geographer, Denis Cosgrove, at the advanced connections among seeing, imagining and representing the area geographically.  Ranging traditionally from the 16th century to the current day, the essays contain reflections upon discovery and the position of mind's eye in giving it that means; colonisation and 16th century gardening; the shaping of yank landscapes; desolate tract, imperial mappings and masculinity; city cartography and utopian visions; conceptions of the Pacific; the cartography of John Ruskin; and the imaginitive grip of the Equator. largely illustrated, this enticing paintings finds the richness and complexity of the geographical mind's eye as expressed during the last 5 centuries.
 

 

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Extra resources for Geography and Vision: Seeing, Imagining and Representing the World (International Library of Human Geography)

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GEOGRAPHY AND VISION mass and volume, composed of tangible and corruptible elements, which required a temporal process of separation from an originally undifferentiated chaos. Light had to be separated from darkness, water from earth, for any semblance of balance and harmony to be established and sustained within the corruptible elemental sphere. This cosmogony too could be observed along the Nile, as a cultural landscape of bounded and differentiated spaces was annually recovered from the confused chaos of earth and water left by flood, and the earth once more made productive.

42 In similar vein but with a different reference point, Geddes’ pupil, Patrick Abercrombie, creator of the influential post-war plan for London, appealed to Chinese geomancy or feng shui as a way of grasping intrinsic environmental and spatial order. New technology, particularly powered flight, which seemed to many mid-twentieth-century observers to offer a wholly new vision of spatial order, required a reworking of our ‘graphic vocabulary’: To convert this new environment into a human landscape, we need more than a rational grasp of nature.

An order supposedly evident in Georgian townscape and parkland, when God’s handiwork in nature had been complemented by cultivation and building, was deemed to have been lost to the evils of urban industrialism in the succeeding century. This conservative narrative forms the structure of the most influential single twentiethcentury text on landscape in England, W. G. 40 Progressive modernists believed that electricity and scientifically advanced technologies offered an opportunity to recapture the ‘natural’ order without abandoning the benefits of human progress.

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