The Biology and Utilization of Grasses by V. B. Youngner

By V. B. Youngner

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There is some evidence that Professor Hansen's collections were planted at Highmore, South Dakota, but the plantings were lost when the grass nurseries were plowed in 1908. Professor Hansen's efforts to introduce crested wheatgrass ended in failure. S. Department of Agriculture obtained 4- to 5-lb samples of six accessions of crested wheatgrass from Director Bogdan. These seed lots were distributed over the period from 1907 to 1913. Although the grass looked promising at several locations, the only seed increase was at Newell, South Dakota.

A suggestion of more ancient amphiploidy is provided by the North American endemics O. racemosa (J. E. Smith) Ricker(« = 23) and O. asperifolia Michx. (n = 23) which are strikingly intermediate between American 11-chromosome diploids such as O. ) Hitchc. or O. ) Torr. and the 12-chromosome diploids of the Balkan Peninsula and the Near East (Johnson, 1945b). Bowden (1960) reported chromosome counts of In = 48 for O. racemosa and O. asperifolia and a count of In = 24 for O. pungens which, if correct, still do not negate the possible amphiploid origin for the first two.

E. Smith) Ricker(« = 23) and O. asperifolia Michx. (n = 23) which are strikingly intermediate between American 11-chromosome diploids such as O. ) Hitchc. or O. ) Torr. and the 12-chromosome diploids of the Balkan Peninsula and the Near East (Johnson, 1945b). Bowden (1960) reported chromosome counts of In = 48 for O. racemosa and O. asperifolia and a count of In = 24 for O. pungens which, if correct, still do not negate the possible amphiploid origin for the first two. The affinities of O. hymenoides (n = 24) are puzzling.

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